Sugar Drink Warning Labels



Sugar-sweetened beverages, or SSBS, have proven links to serious diseases, including obesity, diabetes and tooth decay. In light of these risks, consumers deserve to know—and sugar drink labels should disclose—those health risks. A warning label on sugar drinks would empower consumers to know what they're in for in every bottle of these beverages they consume.


An example of a soda warning label as proposed in New York, Feb. 2016

Some states and cities are already making progress with a soda warning label. Legislation in New York - Assembly Bill 2320-B and Senate Bill S 6435 - would require health warning labels on certain beverages with added sugar. The goal is to educate the public and lower consumption of these unhealthy drinks, similar to the goal of having warning labels on cigarette packages. The legislation would require the warning on bottles, cans, vending machines, dispensers, and at all points of purchase.

Why should there be warning labels on sugar drinks?

  • Sodas and other SSBs are dangerous. An extra soft drink a day increases a child’s risk of becoming obese by about 60 percent. Adults who drink one sugar drink or more a day are 27 percent more likely to be overweight or obese than non-drinkers. And people who consume sugar drinks regularly—one to two cans a day or more—have a 26 percent greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than people who rarely consume such drinks.
  • Sugar drinks contribute substantially to the health disparities that disproportionately burden communities of color and lower economic status. Hispanic Americans are 20 percent more likely to be obese than white Americans and 50 percent more likely to die from diabetes. African Americans are 50 percent more likely to be obese than white Americans and more than twice as likely to die from diabetes.

New York’s sugar drink warning label

New York in particular has much to gain from a sugar-drink warning label. More than one out of every ten people in New York has type 2 diabetes, and one in four is obese. One in five adolescents in New York drinks a sugar drink daily. This educational measure would provide New Yorkers with information to help them make healthier choices.

In February 2016, the New York bills were introduced. The goal is to educate the public and lower consumption of these unhealthy drinks, similar to the goal of having warning labels on cigarette packages.

Memorandums of support for the New York sugar drink warning label:

Read more about the New York sugar drink warning label here:


Donate to CSPI

I want to be part of the fight for safer, more nutritious food by contributing to CSPI.

Donate to CSPI Now

NAH

NAH

Subscribe Now

Subscribe Now »

Subscribe Today and Save!

In Recent Issues


Cover Story: 1 in 8: What You May Not Know About Breast Cancer


Special Feature: Soy Oh Soy: Is It Really Bad For You?


Brand-Name Rating: Pasta Sauce


NAH
Subscribe Now

Request permission to reuse content

The use of information from this site for commercial purposes is strictly prohibited without written permission from CSPI.

BBB Guidestar Great Nonprofits

CSPI meets the stringent financial accountability and management standards of the Council of Better Business Bureau's Wise Giving Alliance, is a "valued partner" with Guidestar, and is rated a "high-impact" nonprofit by Philanthropedia. These independent ratings are your guarantee that every dollar you contribute to CSPI will be used to its maximum effect! You can access reports on CSPI at www.give.org, www.guidestar.org, and www.myphilanthropedia.org. Thank you